Editor's choice

Editor's choice

The ones who dream

Originally published in the May 2017 Dramatics.

The past 12 months have been a dream for songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. Their first original musical, Dear Evan Hansen, opened Off-Broadway and won them an Obie Award last May. The show then transferred to Broadway in December, mere days before La La Land opened in wide release. In January, the team received Oscar nominations for two songs from that film, winning an Academy Award for the movie’s signature number, “City of Stars.”

Amid the whirlwind of the past year, the pair also participated in the 2017 Junior Theater Festival West with EdTA’s Junior Thespians this February and in the 2016 International Thespian Festival last June, when Dramatics caught up with the busy duo.



The show must go on

Originally published in the spring 2017 Teaching Theatre.

Creative arts instructors are often the only people tasked with year-round production schedules unique to teaching theatre, in addition to managing personal and family obligations on top of apathetic students, difficult parents, and a laundry list of other day-to-day responsibilities. The pressure can become overwhelming for even the most seasoned educator, and there’s a very real need to look for ways to help teachers avoid burnout by managing critical stress and finding the resources they need to maintain a healthy, energetic approach to shaping future generations of students.





Ready, set, Festival!

Originally published in the February 2017 Dramatics.

The 2017 International Thespian Festival is upon us! Event coordinators anticipate 4,500 delegates at this year’s event, taking place June 19-24 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Festival’s home for more than 20 years. This year's event features 11 main stage performances, 29 Chapter Select Showcase productions, and more than 200 workshops on acting, dialects, stagecraft, costuming, improv, makeup, directing, musical theatre, playwriting, and other theatre-related topics for students and educators.





Perfect pairing

Originally published in the December 2016 Dramatics.

Hailey Brunson never thought a theatre course would lead her to the White House. The course, a partnership between Virginia’s Rock Ridge High School and Richard Bland College, a two-year junior college associated with the College of William and Mary, allows high school students to enroll simultaneously in two different academic programs and educational institutions. If successful, they obtain credit for their work from both schools, offering the opportunity to acquire college credit for work completed while still in high school.





In a heartbeat

Originally published in the April 2016 Dramatics.

What does a neurological disorder have to do with Shakespeare? Kelly Hunter has been working with young people on the autism spectrum for years, developing a series of drama games based on the poetry, feelings, and themes found throughout Shakespeare. Called the Hunter Heartbeat Method, the games are designed to be accessible, enjoyable, and inspiring to children on the spectrum. Four centuries after Shakespeare’s death, Hunter’s work presents new questions about the plays and the characters we’ve known so well for so long: does Shakespeare possess a power that hasn’t been fully tapped? Can the simple rhythm of the language and the potent, uncut emotions coursing through his plays possibly serve as lifelines for those struggling to express themselves?



Find the funny

Originally published in the spring 2016 Teaching Theatre.

In September, comedian Drew Lynch, an alum of Thespian Troupe 5273 at Las Vegas Academy of the Arts, was named first runner-up on season ten of America’s Got Talent, just four years after a life-altering accident that nearly crushed his dream of performing. In 2011, Lynch was playing shortstop with a softball team from the comedy club where he was a ticket taker when the batter hit a ground ball that bounced and hit him in the throat. He went home and tried to sleep it off, but woke up with a permanent stutter. Lynch reflected on his journey during his keynote speech at the 2016 EdTA National Conference.




Lin-Manuel Miranda is in the show

Originally published in the March 2016 Dramatics.

At thirty-five, with Hamilton, Lin-Manuel Miranda is at the top of the theatre world after only three Broadway musical credits, following his Tony Award-winning In the Heights and his contributions of music and lyrics to Bring It On. He’s already broken into film, writing cantina music for Star Wars: The Force Awakens and writing the score for Disney’s animated feature, Moana. He has performed at the White House. He’s welcomed at events from the Kennedy Center Honors to gatherings of historians who seem to love Hamilton just as much as die-hard musical theatre buffs. In the midst of all this attention and activity he’s still very connected to his roots. Anyone who follows him on Twitter can find him relating stories about his parents, his wife, his young son, his relatives, and his countless friends, as well as chatting with as many fans as he can.

The experience of high school theatre never seems to be very far from Miranda’s mind. He speaks of it often, and his school theatre experiences are the explicit topic of our interview. 


Shackled by debt

Originally published in the February 2016 Dramatics.

A former chair of the International Thespian Officers, Sarah Davenport completed a B.F.A. in acting in May of 2015 after four rigorous years inside the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music. As a result, Davenport is $50,000 in debt from student loans, both private and federal. She thinks she should be making monthly payments of around $300, but right now, she said, she doesn’t have enough left over each month for even $100 payments. The interest and the years of her life Davenport could possibly spend in debt are racking up, and collectors, she said, have started calling. Looking back, Davenport thinks that while she had a handle on the numbers, she didn’t fully understand the tremendous impact her student loan debt could have on her daily life and her long-term future plans for owning a home and having a family. Davenport is not alone. The cost of higher education is a hot topic right now, and Dramatics set out to understand what it’s like to be trying to launch a career as an actor while also managing a significant amount of student loan debt.